Into It Over It

London Music Hall & SummerCamp Productions present..

Into It Over It

Foxing, Kittyhawk, First Ghost

Sun, October 5, 2014

7:00 pm

$12.00

Into It Over It
Into It Over It
Evan Thomas Weiss is more than just a singer-songwriter; he's a storyteller.

The 27-year-old driving force behind solo act Into It. Over It. has been penning his tales since 2007. With music that is wholly heartfelt and unabashedly unapologetic, Weiss has been making waves in both the indie and punk rock worlds since the release of his debut, "52 Weeks."

The collection of songs – which, as the name suggests, was written over the course of a year – began as a project without grand intentions. But as he discovered that people genuinely liked his music, he continued writing. His debut was followed up by a series of splits, featuring songs about towns, which would later be compiled onto "Twelve Towns," an album that came out earlier this year. There was also the split with Koji, featuring five songs about neighborhoods in Chicago, which is where Weiss is located. And finally, in September of this year, Weiss came out with "Proper," a 12-song release which, in some sense, he feels is his first proper album.

"I am so proud of that record, and with the amount of time we had to make it, which wasn't very much, I'm really pleased with how it came out," Weiss said. "And I think people are generally really stoked on it."

Disregarding his track record of writing songs that are thematically related, Weiss' approach this time around was to pay attention to how the songs fit together and fed into one another.

"We made a point to make a cohesive album, which we'd never done before when we were writing songs," Weiss said of the collaboration between himself and drummer Nick Wakim.

With the exception of Wakin's role, the rest of the album is entirely written and performed by Weiss. This, admittedly, can create some confusion on the road for fans who have only heard the recordings and assumed that Into It. Over It. was a full band.

While there is always the possibility of touring with a full backing band, the slight disparity between the recorded and the live versions is something that Weiss treasures when performing in front of crowds.

"I think it adds a different vibe to the songs and it allows them to become more personal for people," he said. "The songs are so personal that it's like I want to share that intimacy with people that would come see the show."

Earlier this month, Weiss played Berlin on his first European tour in two years, opening for The Swellers and Broadway Calls

"It's been nice to get my feet wet again, playing shows here…cause it's a completely different feel," he said of the experience. "[And] it's been rad playing for crowds that aren't necessarily mine…and being able to win a bunch of people over."

Although he has been friends with members of the bands for a long time, Weiss acknowledged that his music doesn't necessarily "fit" with that of theirs. Because of this, audience members who aren't there to see him specifically are often skeptical of him at first. The good thing though, is that he said he acquires new fans that way.

"To see someone get on stage with just an acoustic guitar…you get written off pretty quickly," he said of the experience. "It's definitely been a lot of me, like, having to like, show my worth."

Although Weiss might come across as a songwriting powerhouse, he shared that he isn't always initially confident about his songs, explaining that they don't tend to see the light of day until after they're already recorded and it's too late to take them back.

"I do run into periods of self-doubt," he said of the songwriting. "But really that struggle is just an internal struggle."

When it comes down to it, he said he is proud of each and every one of the songs he has come up with.

"I mean, there's 95 songs [and] I love them all, like, I really like every single song," he said. "You know, maybe there's things about them that I would have changed, had I recorded them again, but, like, as far as the music goes, or the message, or what I was talking about, they're all really important to me."

Looking back on the past four years, Weiss said his attitude toward his songs hasn't changed; the old ones are just as meaningful to him as the new ones. But he did admit that he himself has changed, both as a musician and a human being.

"I'm a little more focused and I'm more responsible and I think I'm just overall a better person than I was when I started, but I think that also just comes with age," he said with a laugh. "I would just say I'm more of a grown-up, like, in a good way, you know. Not in a boring way."
Foxing
Foxing
If you've ever looked at an old document and noticed brown spots on it, what you are seeing are signs of aging. It's not exactly clear what specifically causes them, but one day, the page will completely brown over and be no more. This is called foxing.

A group of St. Louis musicians took this idea and turned it into a band. "From the conception of the band, we realized: we're not gonna be around forever," says Foxing singer Conor Murphy. "There's classic literature that over time grows really old. But hopefully, you can make something that meant something at some point and will mean something down the road, even if it is aged and dated. That's always what keeps me going, the idea that we're writing something now that we won't be able to write in ten years." At only 21, Murphy is wise beyond his years and Foxing's debut album, The Albatross is indisputable proof of that.

The Albatross has an epically beautiful, almost cinematic quality to it, a fact which the band members, some of whom were film students, are acutely aware of. Listening to their song "Rory" along with the music video they made for it is not only an emotionally jarring experiences but highlights the fact that Foxing have a bigger picture in mind than simply making music. It's not just a sound, it's a deeper, fuller concept fueled by a palpable sense of raw honesty and soul- bearing. It's not just a band, it's the most vulnerable parts of their lives, reflected back at them.

Coll and Murphy write the lyrics together and cull from their lives and current real-life experiences. They are open and genuine about themselves in their lyrics, almost to a fault, sometimes putting a strain on their relationships with those around them. "The people that those songs are about, there's no way they wouldn't know it was about them," says Coll. "Sometimes, there's the desire to not put your life so far out there. But it's also important to not hold back." The two have a unique process of co-editing each other's songs. "When we were writing the record, one of the biggest things I'd talk to Conor about was: I don't care if people like this record or not. I mean, I want people to enjoy it, but the one thing that would gut me would be if people said the lyrics are disingenuous."

Foxing's forthright lyrical honesty paired with their stunning orchestral sound quickly started earning them devoted fans, some of whom have been so emotionally moved that they've openly wept at the band's live shows. It's something Foxing didn't expect and certainly were not prepared for. "I was really surprised at the reception we got from this record because it's very, very specific and personal so it's weird to have people grasp that and feel a kindredness to it, that's insane to me," says Coll. In addition to the new fans who were responding to Foxing's music in such a personal way, the band also caught the attention of Triple Crown Records. The label took notice of the organic buzz surrounding the band and are re-mastering and re-releasing The Albatross.

Although The Albatross has a distinctly timeless quality it about it, Foxing recognize that while they're proud of the album, it won't hold up forever. Much like their namesake, the pages their words are written on will eventually brown over and fade away. "The thing that binds everybody together is the idea that death is completely imminent. age is an ever-looming idea that we can all agree on," notes Murphy. "We make this music, we release it, and then, one day, it dies."
Kittyhawk
Four emo kids with nothing to give…
Venue Information:
London Music Hall - CA
185 Queens Ave.
London, ON, N6A 1J1
http://www.londonmusichall.com/

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