Three Days Grace

London Music Hall & FM96 presents

Three Days Grace

Halestorm

Thu, November 12, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

This event is all ages

Three Days Grace
Three Days Grace
There's something a little creepy about growing up in a town so small, you can bear witness to indiscretions and trace the causes and effects on people's lives. On the self-titled Jive debut from Three Days Grace, the Toronto-based trio originally from Norwood, Ontario, Canada, has produced a potent hard-edged rock album, filled with melodic choruses and lyrics that explore the darker side of human behavior.

From the first single, "(I Hate) Everything About You," which deals with love-hate relationships; to confronting and fighting for your individuality in "Just Like You," Three Days Grace writes songs of inner struggle and the desire, in a way, for freedom.  Musically, there's a range from the eerie "Let You Down," with its near demented vocal to the progressive "Burn" with its intricate rhythms, to a more straight ahead rocker such as "Home."

"We saw a lot of crazy things growing up and a lot of our material comes from that," says drummer Neil Sanderson, the more garrulous of the three.

"I don't find it easy to write about happy shit," admits lead singer-guitarist Adam, somberly. "You don't need a release when you're happy."

Adam and Brad grew up in Norwood, a town of 1500 people, just one set of streetlights, but a city's worth of drama.  "You get a different perspective on people," explains Brad. "Everyone knows each other and you can't hide anything. Maybe that's why we can see through the façade that many people hide behind."

Neil hails from Peterborough, just 25 minutes away, a bigger city, which has spawned model/actress Estella Warren and rocker Sebastian Bach. When the band first formed a rock group (under a different name with a different repertoire) in high school, Adam isn't exaggerating when he says, "all 1500 people in Norwood were supporting the band."

The guys didn't strategize about how to get their faces on MTV or land a coveted record deal. They just loved playing live, anywhere.  "We opened for a movie once," Neil points out. "We used to cruise up to the Muskokas (Ontario cottage country) in my K car with a tent trailer on the back and play three hour sets at the local bars."
Halestorm
Halestorm
After scoring two top 10 singles ("I Get Off" and "It's Not You") from their self-titled debut and touring steadily for two years with acts as diverse as Shinedown, Stone Sour, Disturbed, Megadeth, Papa Roach, Godsmack and countless others, Pennsylvania quartet Halestorm are back with their second full-length, The Strange Case of…. Musically diverse and emotionally revealing, the album resonates with a newfound poignancy that takes Halestorm to a new level of creative achievement.

"I was extremely proud of Halestorm when we released it, and I still love it, but I think I was using mostly one musical technique throughout," explains frontwoman Lzzy Hale. "We were on 'ten,' and we blew through the songs in a safe way – or as safe as something that goes, 'I get off on you getting off on me' can be. This new record demonstrates more depth and heart. It's a lot more expressive and really lets down the barriers."

Halestorm started writing for the new record while they were on the road in 2010. Then when the band finished the Uproar Tour in May 2011, they entered the studio with producer Howard Benson (3 Doors Down, Seether, Three Days Grace) and tracked one of the heaviest songs of their career, "Love Bites (So Do I)."

"At that time, I decided, 'I'm going to scream my head off and make really gritty songs,'" Hale says. "When we finished 'Love Bites,' the engineer at Howard's studio, Bay Seven, said, 'I'm pretty sure that's the fastest song we've ever done here.'"

Excited by the escalated tempos and raw energy, Hale returned to writing mode and bashed out more anthemic rockers filled with uncompromising rhythms, soaring vocals and searing leads. Then one night at 4 a.m., after enduring a personal setback, she wrote a bare, vulnerable sounding song and recorded it on her cell phone. Flooded by emotion and maybe a glass of wine too many, she immediately emailed the unpolished song to Benson and the band's A&R man.

"The next morning I regretted having sent it because I didn't hear back from them," she says. "And then a day later they got back to me and went, 'Oh, my God, we didn't know you had this in you. Please write more songs like that.'"

Encouraged by the support and inspired by the urge to purge, Hale wrote more intimate numbers, including the sensitive piano ballad "Break In," the sparse and melancholy "In Your Room" and the mid-paced ode "Beautiful With You." She and her band mates also crafted heavier numbers, including "I Miss The Misery," with its start-stop chorus rhythm and confrontational lyrics and "Rock Show," which blazes with euphoric vocals and motivational riffs. That was when Halestorm realized the new collection of songs was somewhat schizophrenic. At first Hale was unsettled by the polarization, then she penned the song "Mz. Hyde" specifically about the two disparate sides of her personality and the album immediately swam into focus.
Venue Information:
London Music Hall - CA
185 Queens Ave.
London, ON, N6A 1J1
http://www.londonmusichall.com/

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